Tag Archive | Israel

Stuxnet Attack on Iran was Illegal? Read more inside…

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s (NATO) researchers have uncovered a serious reality in the Stuxnet case against Iran (brought on by the US and Israel). NATO’s researchers call it an “act of force”, which was apparently an illegal move.

“Acts that kill or injure persons or destroy or damage objects are unambiguously uses of force” and likely violate international law, according to the Tallinn Manual on the International Law Applicable to Cyber Warfare, a study produced by international legal experts at the request of NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defense Center of Excellence in Estonia.

Apparently, it is prohibited, “according to the U.N. charter, the use of force is prohibited, except in self-defense,” says Michael N. Schmitt, a lead author on The Tallinn Manual on the International Law Applicable to Cyber Warfare.

According to the Washington Times, The international group of researchers who wrote the manual were unanimous that Stuxnet — the self-replicating cyberweapon that destroyed Iranian centrifuges that were enriching uranium — was an act of force, said Mr. Schmitt, professor of international law at the U.S. Naval War College in Newport, R.I.

Also, the article stated that neither Israel nor the United States has publicly acknowledged being behind Stuxnet, but anonymous U.S. national security officials have told news outlets that the two countries worked together to launch the attack, which set the Iranian nuclear program back as much as two years, according to some estimates.

A manual produced by 20 researchers in NATO, as well as some legal scholars and senior military lawyers, details 300 pages worth of important cybersecurity analysis.

“We wrote it as an aid to legal advisers to governments and militaries, almost a textbook,” Schmitt told the paper. “We wanted to create a product that would be useful to states to help them decide what their position is. We were not making recommendations, we did not define best practice, we did not want to get into policy,” he said.

More detailed investigation is probable in this matter.

Another missing link in Stuxnet Reveals Earlier Infection Time

Stuxnet, the government malware believed to have been created by a dual-venture of the US and Israel, and the one used to attack the Iran nuclear enrichment facility, is now believed to have an earlier attack link. It is believed now that sometime in 2008 was when the facility may have been in progress of attacks from Stuxnet.

Iran leaders met in Kazakhstan this week to discuss with members of the UN Security Council the nuclear program. The researchers there announced a new variant of the sophisticated Stuxnet cyberweapon.

Some have noted that the US and Israel may have partnered way before doing similar activities to try to take down the nuclear enrichment program in Iran.

The new variant was designed as a different attack vector against the centrifuges for the uranium enrichment program, versus later versions released. This “new variant” was apparently released in 2007. Here we are six years later, knowing the discovery of such variant. This shows that the current versions of Stuxnet were made in 2009, which means this variant now recognized predated the original code that researchers found. Therefore, its first version may have been in 2007. That tells security experts this: Stuxnet was attacking much earlier than previously thought.

Still to make a rebuttal, Iran is awaiting and planning new cyberwarriors, which can construct cyberattacks and cyberterrorism on the US.

Looking in the code of the 2007 version, it was used for Siemens PLCs, which are used in the Iran nuclear enrichment program in Natanz. It was aimed at sabotaging the valves’ operations, by controlling the flow of uranium.

The list of new information goes on. According to Wired Magazine, the new finding, described in a paper released by Symantec on Tuesday (.pdf), resolves a number of longstanding mysteries around a part of the attack code that appeared in the 2009 and 2010 variants of Stuxnet but was incomplete in those variants and had been disabled by the attackers.

Anonymous Claims Leak of 3000 Donors for Israel

Hacktivist group Anonymous today claimed to have leaked the personal information — including home address, phone numbers, and email addresses — of over 3,000 individuals who are said to have donated to pro-Israel group, Unity Coalition for Israel.

This move comes after they attacked over 650 Israeli sites on November 17th, wiping their databases and leaking the usernames and passwords found within. Clearly, Anonymous is gearing up for an extended campaign against Israel as its conflict with Hamas heats up.

The file on Pastebin is extensive, and we haven’t had time to process it in full, but there appears to be personal information for at least one incumbent US Senator listed, Daniel Inouye of Hawaii, who fought the Nazis in World War II and has developed a close relationship with Israel as a politician.

 

Read more on NextWeb

Cyberwar continues, Attacks on Iran infrastructure slows Internet access

Various parts of the Islamic Republic were disrupted yesterday (their Internet access) after hackers attacked Iran’s infrastructure and communications companies. “Yesterday we had a heavy attack against the country’s infrastructure and communications companies which has forced us to limit the Internet,” the secretary of the High Council of Cyberspace, Mehdi Akhavan Behabadi, is said by Reuters as having told the Iranian Labour News Agency about the issues.

Some officials claim that their Internet access in Iran is constantly disrupted by cyberattacks, however, the ones yesterday were the most noticeable. This attack would be one of the largest cyberattacks so far, after several gigabytes of traffic overwhelmed the Iranian infrastructure. This is still widely accusative that the US and Israel could be involved, as a response to the nuclear program developed by Iran.

It is noticed also that the cyberwar is heating up for Iran, and that Iran could be constructing counterattacks, such as the recent one against US banks. All of these concentrated attacks are all part of military plans, which are developing “cyber warriors” or a “cyber army”. As always, news about cyberwar will continue to be on this blog.

 

Flame malware command-and-control servers reveal earlier origins, among other links

Government malware, Flame, Stuxnet, etc. is expanding and becoming more of a problem. Computer systems are getting even more inventive, but not at the alarming rate that dangerous malware is expanding. There may be more links other than Stuxnet for Flame.

First, computer systems are created for specific purposes, and have been for about forty years now. However, some of the newer computer systems are created to become like robots, which means that the computer system works on its own without user intervention. But, what happens when malware targets the core computer systems of oil industries, energy companies, military plants, etc.? It can cause dangerous and severe consequences if the system were to become compromised.

Second, the Flame malware became uprising just this past May, where it infected over 1000 computers, according to Kaspersky Lab. The victims of the first attack included governmental organizations, educational institutes, and personal users. Most of the attacks were central over West Asia, including Iran, Israel, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, among others. Supporting a kill command, which would eliminate all traces of the malware from the computer attacked, this command was sent soon after the malware’s exposure. Right now, there are no reported active infections of Flame, or other variants being created.

However, there are derivatives of the Flame malware being created. We reported a few weeks ago about Shamoon being actively distributed using its skiddie approach. There are other links that were recently found (like Gauss) that can relate Flame to command-and-control usage back to 2006. Which means this Flame project could be as much as 6 years old, or is related to malware from then.

Instead of looking like a botnet interface, the Flame command centers look more like content-management systems (CMS), and have many other new approaches. One of its approaches included the three fraudulent certificates, which Microsoft patched to block them back in June.

More news about the findings and C&C servers were fully unveiled to the recent Flame investigation by Kaspersky Lab and the news from Symantec (PDF). Researchers at Kaspersky Lab state they were suspicious about the findings of a development link to Stuxnet back in June, when communication was eavesdropped between the team.

Some of the key developers behind all of this situation include speculation of the US & Israel combined. However, there is no known evidence backing these claims, except for what researchers can reveal about coding types and other methods used.

Much of the articles by Kaspersky Lab and Symantec include the following speculations as well:

  • Four programmers at least tag-teamed on the job of development as their nicknames were left in the code.
  • One-server called home 5000 victim machines during just a one-week period in May, suggesting at least 10,000 victims.
  • The infections weren’t just focused on one-group of organizations or people, but in separate groups of targets in many countries.
  • Many of the targets focused a lot on Iran and Sudan.
  • Different custom protocols were used to communicate with the servers, not just one protocol. Meaning that there were at least four different protocols used to communicate to the servers.
  • Tons of data was stolen, which 5.5 GBs was reported in just one week of data-mining from the malware.
  • The attackers are either mining for government information, or attempting to gain military intelligence.

The developers behind the Flame malware have a lot more secrets, which are being unveiled. More ties are being linked to Stuxnet and Flame, and when the information becomes available, it’ll be here on seCURE Connexion’s blog. The Flame developers obviously have a lot of nerve developing these cyber-weapons. But, many politicians and security experts have warned of this information warfare for years. Here we are at the peak!

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Cyberwar for Iran Heating Up

Apparently, Iran’s intelligence minister has blamed key countries, US, UK, and Israel for plotting a cyberattack against the country.

Also, earlier this month, The New York Times reported that President Obama ordered similar attacks on the super-computers that run Iran’s nuclear plants.

According to Reuters, “Based on obtained information, America and the Zionist regime (Israel) along with the MI6 planned an operation to launch a massive cyber attack against Iran’s facilities following the meeting between Iran and the P5+1 in Moscow,” Iran’s English-language Press TV quoted him as saying.

Another crazy issue would be that since Iranian leaders could not talk to the US/UK/Israel, they assumed an attack was planned. I guess what they don’t know WILL hurt them…right?

What is big about this, is the fact that the cyberwar between the US-based allies (UK + Israel + US) and Iran is heating up. Prepare for more stories like this here on seCURE Connexion!

Israel and the United States: Flame Developers? Really?

The United States and Israel jointly developed a sophisticated computer virus nicknamed Flame that collected intelligence in preparation for cyber-sabotage aimed at slowing Iran’s ability to develop a nuclear weapon, according to Western officials with knowledge of the effort.

The massive piece of malware secretly mapped and monitored Iran’s computer networks, sending back a steady stream of intelligence to prepare for a cyber­warfare campaign, according to the officials.

The effort, involving the National Security Agency, the CIA and Israel’s military, has included the use of destructive software such as the Stuxnet virus to cause malfunctions in Iran’s nuclear-enrichment equipment.

The emerging details about Flame provide new clues to what is thought to be the first sustained campaign of cyber-sabotage against an adversary of the United States.

Read this story now: WashingtonPost.com

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