Tag Archive | LulzSec

LulzSec Hacker Sentenced 30 Years to Life for Alleged Crimes

cybercrime

Jeremy Hammond is in really big trouble. Or, perhaps, the government is just trying to “scare the (expletive) out of him,” in the words of Kevin Mitnick, formerly known as the world’s “most-wanted hacker” and now a security consultant.

Either way, a potential sentence of 30 years to life for alleged hacking crimes is probably enough to get the attention of most 27-year-olds. And that is what U.S. District Judge Loretta Preska told Hammond last week that he could face if he is convicted on all counts.

Hammond, much better known in the world of hactivism by various online aliases including “Anarchaos,” “sup_g,” “burn,” “yohoho,” “POW,” “tylerknowsthis,” and “crediblethreat,” has been held without bail since his arrest in March on charges connected with last year’s hacking of Strategic Forecasting, or Stratfor, an Austin, Texas-based international intelligence broker, by AntiSec, an offshoot of LulzSec, which is in turn an offshoot of the hacktivist collective Anonymous.

The three-count federal indictment, brought in the Southern District of New York, charged him with conspiracy to commit computer hacking, computer hacking and conspiracy to commit access device fraud.

More specifically, the government alleges that starting last December, Hammond and others from AntiSec stole information from about 860,000 Stratfor subscribers, including emails, account information, and data from about 60,000 credit cards. The government alleges that he published some of that information online, and used some of the stolen credit card data to run up at least $700,000 in unauthorized charges.

Source information and more information on CSO

More news in Sony Pictures hack, LulzSec member Rivera pleads guilty

cybercrime

LulzSec member, Raynaldo Rivera, who was arrested at the end of August, appeared in court this past Thursday (Oct. 11), and has plead guilty to the charges of being involved in hacking into Sony Pictures, as well as for stealing personal information, passwords, and other personal data from thousands of users.

Under the plea agreement, Rivera will pay restitution to his victims and faces the maximum penalty: five year prison sentence and a fine of at least $250,000.

Because of this “simple SQL injection“, it costed Sony over $600,000 apparently, which is not cheap change by any means.

Rivera used the HideMyAss proxy service, illegally according to their Terms, to investigate potential vulnerabilities on Sony servers. HideMyAss proxy service cooperated with authorities, providing a report of the data transactions made by the hacker.

Alleged LulzSec Member Arrested by FBI for Sony Hack

cybercrime

LulzSec

A man alleged to hacking in to Sony Pictures Entertainment computer systems has been arrested. A man named Raynaldo Rivera has been arrested, not only for hacking, but also for stealing personal information, passwords, and other personal data from thousands of users. Most of the information leaked was about innocent users whom entered contests held by Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Because of this “simple SQL injection“, it costed Sony over $600,000 apparently, which is not cheap change by any means.

Rivera used the HideMyAss proxy service, illegally according to their Terms, to investigate potential vulnerabilities on Sony servers. The alleged hacker is known by the online handles, “neuron”, “wildicv”, or “royal”. He could face up to 15 years in prison, if convicted.

 

Protect your computer:

Anonymous: Sabu 6-month Sentencing Wait

cybercrime

LulzSecSabu, mole hacker of Anonymous small groups Antisec and LulzSec, now has a wait time on his sentence, because of his cooperation with the FBI. The cooperation is done to help the FBI track down hackers involved with Anonymous, and attempt to put an end to the nonsense.

Since the FBI arrested Sabu, or his real name Hector Xavier Monsegur, last June, he’s been working undercover for them. After providing information leading to arrests of several Antisec and LulzSec members, the charges/sentencing is being waited for Sabu.

The reactions from fellow LulzSec/Anonymous members has been utter denial of his original involvement with the group, and how Sabu even got the idea that spilling the details would help the groups’ plans: “Activism and hacking, also known as Hacktivism. It involves protest against the government, corporations, news media, etc. using street protest and online blackhat hacking. Usually the hacking done by these members has been more blackhat style, in which they are doing it for the purpose of damage and to also gain money. Makes Anonymous seem more illegitimate if you look at it like that.

Although unstated what the plea deal was, Sabu is entitled to a maximum charge (after pleading guilty in March) to 124 years in prison. The charges involved 12 federal offenses, including conspiracy to commit computer hacking, and conspiracy to commit bank fraud, among other charges. Some of the things mentioned by Sabu led to other charges for hackers that were also arrested from Anonymous.

Since LulzSec’s & Antisec’s fallout, small hacking groups have appeared and then disappeared, including SpexSec and r00tbeersec. Since Sabu’s leave, Anonymous has never been the same. Who would care? Their unethical behavior must be stopped. The only way to get it to stop is to continue to hold strong to our values and beliefs. The world system cannot be perfect, and they seem to have this idea it can be. The economic difficulties all around the world complicate every year. There is no end to struggle, it’s part of life.

Anonymous Admits to Handing Syrian Data to WikiLeaks

Might not be a problem for any other country, but Syria has issues now…government data handed over to exploit firm WikiLeaks!

In a press release published Saturday, a group dubbed Anonymous Op Syria admitted to hacking into multiple domains and servers inside Syria on Feb. 5 to obtain e-mails (more than two million emails from Syrian political figures, ministries and associated companies, dating from August 2006 to March 2012), which it then gave to WikiLeaks.

Many of the details exposed in the hacker paste (AnonPaste) include:

On Febuary 5, 2012 at approx. 4:00 PM ET USA an Anonymous Op Syria team consisting of elements drawn from Anonymous Syria, AntiSec (now known as the reformed LulzSec) and the Peoples Liberation Front succeeded in creating a massive breach of multiple domains and dozens of servers inside Syria. This team had been working day and night in shifts for weeks to accomplish this feat. So large was the data available to be taken, and so great was the danger of detection (especially for the members of Anonymous Syria, many of whom are “in country”) that the downloading of this data took several additional weeks.

On March 14, 2012 after analyzing the truly staggering trove of E-Mail recovered in this hack, participants in Anonymous Op Syria isolated the personal E-Mail of the dictator Assad and his wife and publicly released this small trove to the world via a press release similar to this one. This disclosure made headlines around the world, but it remained just a tiny fraction of the total data recovered in the original hack. Anonymous Op Syria, and indeed the entire global collective – were at a bit of a loss as to exactly how to deal with and properly disclose such a vast trove of important information. But there is one organization that is supremely well equipped to handle a disclosure of this magnitude, WikiLeaks. Having already formed a partnership with WikiLeaks in the disclosure of the “Stratfor Files”, it seemed natural and obvious to continue this historic partnership between Anonymous and WikiLeaks with the disclosure of the “Syria Files”. And thus…

On July 5, 2012 – Five months virtually to the day after the brave hackers of Anonymous and the PLF breached the Assad regime servers, WikiLeaks released to the world 2.4 million E-Mail files belonging to the Syrian regime and various Syrian companies. And this is just beginning, expect many more disclosures of this type in the future as this wonderful partnership between WikiLeaks and Anonymous continues to grow stronger and change human history.

The group noted in their public statement that there will be “many more disclosures of this type in the future as this wonderful partnership between WikiLeaks and Anonymous continues to grow stronger and change human history.”

Latest Hacks on AT&T and Comcast

"WikiBoatWednesday" is the latest battle cry from hackers who are targeting corporations and government sites to show for whistleblower site WikiLeaks and to promote other causes.

“WikiBoatWednesday” is the latest battle cry from hackers who are targeting corporations and government sites to show support for whistleblower site WikiLeaks and promote other causes or concerns.

A group of hackers has posted to the Web today data that appears to include Comcast employee names, ages and salaries, as well as e-mails and passwords associated with AT&T VoIP service accounts.

Proclaiming the kickoff of “#WikiBoatWednesday…when all the members from @TheWikiBoat fight corruption, leak data, and bring down websites,” the hackers released the data in two different posts to the Pastebin Web site. Several of the Twitter handles used by the group, including @AnonymousWiki, referenced the Anonymous online activist group, but the connection to the larger, decentralized collective is unclear.

Full Story: at CNET

Two Members of LulzSec Plead Guilty

Two former members of the crazy, disgruntled group, LulzSec, plead guilty this morning to conspiracy charges for a spree of hacks on US & UK government/corporate servers. Ryan Cleary, 20, and Jake Davis, 19, were held under the conspiracy charges.

According to The Telegraph, Cleary admitted to constructing DDoS attacks on Sony, Nintendo, News International, Arizona State Police, HBGary Federal and PBS.

Ryan Cleary plead guilty to four additional charges, including hacks of the US Air Force machines located in the Pentagon, when he was indicted by a U.S. federal grand jury.

Apparently, all defendants were released on bail, except for Ryan Cleary.

%d bloggers like this: