Tag Archive | McAfee

Annual Antivirus Toplist Report – 2013 (premium & free)

Welcome to our second toplist of antivirus software. The following are independently reviewed security products, compiled from a list of average reviews for 2013 products!

Premium

Premium antivirus software provides the best antivirus protection and safeguards your computer, your identity, and all of your personal information saved on the computer. Some programs provide extra features, such as free online backup, auto-sandbox (which runs your programs in a safe environment to make sure they are not malicious), and social networking protection. The percentages in rank were based on an average of virus removal, protection, and overall performance. Note: only some testing data is available, here.

  1. Bitdefender – 95% – Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2013 builds on #1 ranked silent security technology to stop e-threats, secure online transactions, and defend your privacy on social networks.
  2. Kaspersky – 90% – The next recommended program, Kaspersky Antivirus, usually yields the highest results in antivirus testing groups, and is one of the most trusted. Its antivirus product is well worth its cost. What’s even better is the amount of features it has – and the strength of each feature. Each individual feature has a good amount of protection involved. It truly is the pro-active piece of software that every computer needs!
  3. Norton – 87% – Symantec’s awesome Norton products have grown up from a nice antivirus to a very awesome powerhouse packed with great features and a cool-looking interface. Although the interface is a little tough for beginners, it sure has the amount of protection-based features needed to keep the viruses out! With its new identity protection interfaces, it deserves spot two!
  4. F-Secure – 84.4% – F-Secure software has risen up to become a great competitor to other antivirus vendors. Its feature-rich interface and good heuristics, paired with lightweight performance, makes this program a star! Kudos!
  5. Trend Micro – 83.8% – This vendor has absolutely grown up lately, from a bit mediocre to a much better, more advanced antivirus program. They have truly made reviewers (like me) proud!
  6. G Data – 81% – This vendor is not exactly as we expected, when people were telling us how good they are. But, they did do a good job blocking threats, but removing existing threats took quite a while to do. I can understand being thorough, but being a bit more timely might be a good idea..
  7. BullGuard – 78% – This was unexpected. BullGuard, like Trend Micro, surprised us big time. The amount of effort the developers put into this program was unbelievable. We say kudos to the developers! Some improvement is still needed, but nonetheless, good job!
  8. AVG – 77% – AVG for years has provided good protection. It provides great feature rich software. The only takeaway, the problem of false positives, but more realistically – once a system has been infected, AVG software gets hostile (which requires complete uninstall and reinstall for it to work properly again). Their response on false positives is not quick enough, which can cause problems with trust. Trust is very important to PC users. This program came in spot eight, again, because of that!
  9. Avast – 76% – This antivirus program may very well be the feature-rich program of the year. Improving greatly from previous years, it shows each new year how much it has grown to be a beneficial program for almost any system. The only problem that was seen in Avast Pro Antivirus compared to other ones listed above this one, were the ability to stop a malicious download immediately in its tracks. However, with every new program update comes a much better way to block these infected sites.
  10. Webroot – 75% – Webroot has stepped it up with SecureAnywhere, after SpySweeper was retired, but they need to step it up more. Especially on the aspects of removal and protection. Antivirus software needs to be more of protecting and keeping the user safe, not just removing viruses.
  11. Avira – 74% – Avira provides social networking protection, anti-phishing, and pro-active HIPS protection in its newer versions of antivirus. However, it may not be as feature-rich as other programs in its class, and this may take away from the functionality of the antivirus engine (which failed to block a few threats) and does not remove some viruses very well (maybe lacking the proper tools to do it). It did not block 100% of malware, but came fairly – blocking approximately 96% of threats.
  12. ESET – 72.3% ESET has done a great job making NOD32 Antivirus in to a lightweight powerhouse! However, it lacks the ability to find all of the viruses on a hostile system, and the heuristics are a bit lacking. But, hopefully, next year will be much better.
  13. Panda Security – 71.9% – This one was a hard one to judge. When tested on many different systems in the past, it was recognized to provide good protection and great features, however, it lacked performance. Some of the performance lacks had to do with running on a hostile system around a lot of viruses: the program had slowed to a halt. However, the sandbox system, good heuristics, and overall complete protection is what makes it okay!
  14. GFI Vipre – 70.7% – no review written.
  15. McAfee – 66% – no review written.

Free

Free antivirus software provides a temporary means to safeguard your computer, while you can save money for a premium investment…

  1. Avast  – This is growing itself a trend for the best free antivirus. It is thought one of the best promotion techniques they have used in the recent year was contests for their users. From what was seen in our perspective, Avast has an awesomely fast antivirus engine. However, it barely slipped from first place due to its false positives and lack of stronger heuristics needed for the bigger threats. But, since it is free, it goes to show that users need a premium antivirus protection.
  2. AVG – Its good detection and smart heuristics allow it to be a powerful antivirus program, however, it has dealt with false positives on an uncomfortable scale before, so second place is where it sits this time!
  3. Avira  – What is good about Avira Free is that it continually shows good protection against all Windows platforms. What is bad is that it cannot run 100% on heavily infected systems. This is a common problem with antivirus software, but Avira Free has shown to not function very well. May be due to the lack of a well-coded self-protection driver, but nonetheless good luck in the future!
  4. ZoneAlarmIt is assured that ZoneAlarm’s new free program has what it takes to be a good antivirus program. However, due to a few false positives, it ranked 4th this time.
  5. Microsoft Security Essentials – This comes far as one of the most lightweight and simplistic antivirus programs on the market. Microsoft is the maker of the Windows operating system, of course, so it gave users a trustworthiness factor for Microsoft Security Essentials. However, due to the fact it has missed quite a few viruses and it does not remove viruses pretty well, it ranked last on the free list.

Thanks for reading this review. Feel free to comment below. 🙂

Anonymous Says “Expect Us 2013” – #OpNewBlood – McAfee Underestimates

Anonymous is not going away. Just wanted everyone to know that. It’s not a likely thing for them to disappear at all. From what McAfee made it sound like, is that Anonymous was low-key and not a big threat. However, it is to be disagreed with. They could strike crazy at any time with a hacking attack.

Their year-in-review video details what they have done, and it is clear they have similar plans in 2013, if not more. Some are saying the next mission to finally carry out is “#OpNewBlood”. This is actually an old plan, but they’re still carrying it out. There are already tons of posts on Twitter discussing #OpNewBlood, and how many people can freely join Anonymous. Some have linked to how to set up chatting in IRC and how to be anonymous when browsing the Internet. Many recruiting efforts are underway, such as AnonyOnion. Can anyone LOL?

Their press release on AnonNews characterizes an “Expect Us 2013” banner. See for yourself. Apparently, a lot of the new operations would be led by @Crypt0nymous.

Anyway, back to the details about the video, it details info about the temporary shutdown of websites belonging to The US Department of Justice, the FBI, the Motion Picture Association of America – which were all in protest of the indictment of MegaUpload. Although the sites were temporarily down, it sent a message of protest against the US Government, in hopes to say that people still have a voice.

However, the hacktivism continues, and is showcased in the video. It shows newsreels of Anonymous’ intervention in Syria, when the Syrian Government shut down Internet access for a day. Apparently, from what also showed up in the video involved Anonymous’ “cyberwar” against the Israeli Government – when clearly it is a problem with Syria and other neighboring countries.

“The operations which are listed in the video are only examples, there are far more operations,” Anonymous wrote in the statement. “Some of them still running, like Operation Syria. We are still here.”

Despite such threats, and other details that Anonymous threw in the faces of the viewers of the video (with a lot of them saying F*CK YEAH!), many other underestimate their presence. But, what risk can we take in computer security? The first time we let our guard down, Anonymous will strike. They do it every time. Never let your guard down in computer security. McAfee: We’re calling out to you. Stop spreading the message giving people the idea that Anonymous is going to be less active or less threat. We don’t need anymore damage. The more we stay aware, the better protected we will be.

This “syncopathic” (goth jargon: syncope=fainting, pathic=motivation) approach is common for Anonymous…meaning they are silent (kind of when you faint), and then all of the sudden they jump up (motivate quickly) and go into hacking/activism.

Expect Anonymous or get a reality check! That’s all we’re saying here. It’s not worth the mess/damage to let your guard down.

Facebook alliance with key antivirus companies continues, update enclosed

Facebook has announced the expansion of their alliance with antivirus companies in hopes to better secure its users and promote good privacy… here is a quick scope of the details:

Today, we are excited to announce the expansion of our AV Marketplace to include 7 new partners to our growing coalition of security companies. Starting now, Facebook users will be able to download software from – avast!, AVG, Avira, Kaspersky, Panda, Total Defense, and Webroot. Not only do we have new partners but also many of our existing partners – Microsoft, McAfee, Norton, TrendMicro, and Sophos – will begin offering anti-virus software for your mobile devices. You can visit the AV Marketplace now to download your free anti-virus software for PC, Mac and Mobile.

Our new anti-virus partners bring with them both the latest software and comprehensive intelligence. As with our existing partners, these seven companies will help protect Facebook’s community of over a billion users by improving our URL blacklist system. This system scans trillions of clicks per per day, and before each click, the system consults the databases of all our AV Marketplace partners to make sure the website you are about to visit is safe. This means that whenever you click a link on our site you are protected both by Facebook and 12 of the industry leaders in computer security. We will be cooperating with these partners more in the future, and look forward to announcing new tools soon.

Read more now at the Facebook blog

 

 

See more antivirus recommendations

Tech support and fake antivirus scams crackdown by FTC

Yesterday, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced a crackdown on tech support and fake antivirus scams that have been problematic for years. The scams such as bogus computer cleanup programs, phone-based tech support scares, etc. is subject to freezing of assets, as well as lawsuits for the six companies involved in the crackdown. Some of these Technogennie, Virtual PC Solutions, and Connexions InfoTech Services, among others.

Scareware scams have gone on for years, whether the classic ones such as SpySheriff (2005) to Personal Antivirus (2009). Many bouts of scareware have been apparent over the years, and they have really fell off the planet more and more the last couple of years. Why is this? Scareware crackdown from the FBI, FTC, etc. Many scams are being sought out a lot faster so the damage to the user communities is very limited.

These companies caught in the current wrap-up/crackdown from the FTC were boiler-room based, making cold calls to people in English speaking communities. Their attempts were to subject the potential customers to fear that their computer is infected, and telling them to purchase solutions to their problems by paying right away with credit card. However, when the users realized their computer was either not infected at all, or that it was a scam, it was too late and the customer was ripped off. Many banks have given the opportunity for chargeback, but that’s only if the person can truly identify that it was a scam. If no evidence can be drawn up, then it’s hard to get the chargeback.

After getting over 2,000 complaints (estimated 2,400), the FTC immediately froze assets of those companies, shut down their phone numbers used for the cold calling, and began a rapid investigation. Victims were usually charged between $49 to $450 to have a “techie” clean their system. Many of the cold callers posed as Dell, Symantec, or even McAfee.

More news about this freezing on the FTC website.

Now, earlier this week, the FTC won a $163 million settlement in a three year-old case against Innovative Marketing Inc. (IMI) and Kristy Ross, former officer of the company. More on that at the FTC website as well.

Kaspersky Lab offers an award-winning line of antivirus software, anti-spyware and Internet security solutions for your home computer or laptop. Block scareware… Download today!

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