Tag Archive | Saudi Aramco

All-Out Cyberwar is Going On in the Dark, Pentagon Increasing Cybersec Teams

Could there be a “cyber 9/11”? Would there be an all-out cyberwar happening right now? There is a war going on, a cyber one at that, going on here in the states. If you work for a defense contractor, bank, train and plane transportation providers (also including RTAs and other digitally-depending transportation methods), power company, water and utilities plants, etc. are in direct line of fire of potential cyberwar problems.

A brewing cyberwar has been going on in the past year, and usually people view it as governments going head to head (like it would in actual wars). However, there is more of a cyberwar against governments, corporations, and of course the entities we named above.

With seeing government threats, like Stuxnet, Flame, etc., to cybercrime units like Red October, Rustock, even Virut/Waledec – seems like the threat is getting out of hand. With the use of tactics like from these malware powerhouses, our worry for a severe (life-threatening) attack should be a lot greater…mainly to the fact that the US should seriously prepare itself.

“The cyber war has been under way in the private sector for the past year,” says Israel Martinez, a board member of the U.S. National Cyber Security Council, a nonprofit group composed of federal government and private sector executives.

“We’re finding espionage, advanced persistent threats (APTs), and other malware sitting in networks, often for more than a year before it’s ever detected,” Martinez says.

Martinez studies different issues, such as US entities being targeted by fronts from China, Iran for intellectual property theft to other cybercrimes such as stealing identities or cash.

When we look at Stuxnet for example, the US and Israel crafted it jointly to disrupt Iranian nuclear facilities. Problem here is, doing that may have just been a provoking edge to the cybcerwar for Iran to develop something else and revenge. Doing this caused Iran then, to strike back with cyber attacks on US banks. Some have thought Iran was behind the Shamoon virus as well, which wipes out 30K hard drives and taking computers offline at Saudi Aramco for several weeks.

Defense firms in the US are hoping that some of the Fortune 500 cybersecurity companies have a good plan to counterattack and defend for the US to these opponents.

The Pentagon has come back with newer accounts of management for this cyberwar by planning to increase cybersecurity teams. The Senate is continually pushing for legislation for information sharing on threats and cyber attacks. President Obama prepares to issue executive order on cybersecurity, so the Department of Defense is looking for a massive increase in the number of trained cybersecurity personnel helping to defend our country’s public and even private networks.

The government has had trouble in the past looking for the right personnel, since most are employed by agencies that don’t discuss operations publicly (due to the risk of the information getting in to the wrong hands). The Pentagon is planning to push up the number of security professionals up to 5,000 in the next few years (which is up from a little under 1,000). They’re hoping for both military and civilian security personnel to join up, so the diversity helps the US prepare for any issue.

Expect a better take charge situation by corporate, government, and private firms in this cyberwar situation!

Saudi Aramco Incident Investigated Much Closer

We reported back in October about the damage swell of Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia’s oil company, which fell victim to a cyberattack. Some new details have been revealed by a few investigating/reporting organizations…

The New York Times reported the following yesterday:

The attack on Saudi Aramco — which supplies a tenth of the world’s oil — failed to disrupt production, but was one of the most destructive hacker strikes against a single business.

“The main target in this attack was to stop the flow of oil and gas to local and international markets and thank God they were not able to achieve their goals,” Abdullah al-Saadan, Aramco’s vice president for corporate planning, said on Al Ekhbariya television. It was Aramco’s first comments on the apparent aim of the attack.

Hackers from a group called Cutting Sword of Justice claimed responsibility for the attack, saying that their motives were political and that the virus gave them access to documents from Aramco’s computers, which they threatened to release. No documents have yet been published.

The “Cutting Sword of Justice” made a post on PasteBin.com about taking credit for the attack.

We explained previously that most of the cyberattacks this year have been aimed at erasing data on energy companies’ computers. However, renewed thoughts of Aramco are showing the want by hackers to stop the flow of production. Good thing it got sorted out.

The Damage Swell of Saudi Aramco Attack

The New York Times reported about the damages of the attacks on Saudi Aramco, a Saudi Arabian oil firm. The article stated the following, blaming Iran for the attacks on Saudi Aramco along with supporting evidence:

That morning, at 11:08, a person with privileged access to the Saudi state-owned oil company’s computers, unleashed a computer virus to initiate what is regarded as among the most destructive acts of computer sabotage on a company to date. The virus erased data on three-quarters of Aramco’s corporate PCs — documents, spreadsheets, e-mails, files — replacing all of it with an image of a burning American flag.

United States intelligence officials say the attack’s real perpetrator was Iran, although they offered no specific evidence to support that claim. But the secretary of defense, Leon E. Panetta, in a recent speech warning of the dangers of computer attacks, cited the Aramco sabotage as “a significant escalation of the cyber threat.” In the Aramco case, hackers who called themselves the “Cutting Sword of Justice” and claimed to be activists upset about Saudi policies in the Middle East took responsibility.

Intelligence officials are still investigating the nature of the RasGas hack also, because it is related to this attack, which involved a malware called Shamoon.

The investigations of Saudi Aramco and RasGas, Qatar’s top natural gas firm, are coming together. Most of the cyberattacks this year have been aimed at erasing data on energy companies’ computers. More updates to come.

RasGas energy company hacked

One of Qatar’s natual gas companies, RasGas, is the next victim of a cyberattack against an energy company so far in the past month. After following the attack against Saudi Aramco, this attack comes in a similar form: infecting each machine with a virus (of course) causing the company to disable internet access to block the hacker. This disables the ability to fully communicate business across servers of the company.

According to Security Affairs, (As occurred in the case of Saudi Aramco) the malware was not affecting gas extraction and critical processing.

In Saudi Aramco, the Shamoon malware was blamed, and it may be a benefactor in this case, as well. Reporters say there is no damage to any other thing in the company, and it will not take long to clear this problem.

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