Tag Archive | Trojan Horses

Hackers and Virus-makers Retrying Their Luck on Android and Windows Phones

When you look at the scope of Android malware (malicious software/viruses), and then think about Windows Phone malware, it’s as if hackers and virus-makers (“cybercriminals”) are retrying their own luck. What is meant by this? Years ago when malware started gaining big time (probably around 2000), these cybercriminals tried a number of ways to hack the Windows API/kernel, causing innumerable issues for Windows users. Now, today’s market looks like it’s being done all over again.

During the 2000s era, it seemed like we had quite a few different types of malware. Here are those types explained in today’s market for smartphone malware:

  • Dialer: a trojan app/program that automatically dials premium rate numbers and attempts to rack up charges on the user’s phone bill. This can be highly costly, so removing it immediately is the best option.
  • Trojan: a common name for any type of app/program that is designed to look like it does one thing, but it’s code does something else untrustworthy. Many options trojans pick would be the stealing of personal data off of the device, or changing the settings of a device to make it behave a different way.
  • Virus: a self-replicating piece of code, infects other files, or just damages files on devices.
  • Spyware: another trojan app/program, which decides to attempt the stealing of personal data on the user’s device.
  • Adware: another trojan app/program designed to show ads to the user, sometimes flooding their screen. Commonly, these ads are personalized for the user, by getting a scope of the type of apps they have.
  • Rootkit: a piece of trojan code, designed to get administrator privileges on the device, and then take control (and manipulate) of the system.

As you can see, some of those issues are as prevalent on mobile devices as they were on Windows operating systems in the 2000s era.

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Fall Malware Threats 2012

Latest release of Fall Malware for 2012 from seCURE Connexion

The goal in releasing a comprised list of threats that security companies will be dealing with the most this Fall is to help instruct users on the latest vectors, so that they know how important it is to maintain an updated antivirus program.

Most of the malware threats listed below are audience aggregated, which means what most security companies are dealing with currently, and there is no hope of it ending anytime soon. These are in order of the most distributed.

KEY: Vir=Virus, Rtk=Rootkit, Trj=Trojan, WM=Worm, Adw=Adware, Spy=Spyware

  1. Trj.ZeroAccess(Sirefef)
  2. Trj.Agent
    • The Agent trojan is a backdoor proxy trojan, that attempts to change the proxy on the target computer to help redirect search results and browsing activity in attempts to mine money or bitcoins.
    • Outlook: Seems this trojan is the most updated trojan ever seen, and will continue to be a problem with all of its low-to-medium risk threats.
  3. Vir.Sality
    • See Microsoft’s writeup
    • Outlook: Sality has been a problem for a few years now, and it still will be a problem. It infects almost every user/system file on the operating system.
  4. Rtk.TDL4/TDSS
    • See Microsoft’s writeup
    • Outlook: TDL4 has continued to be a problem and will continue to be a problem as long as computers have a working master boot record.
  5. Adw.FakeAV
    • See Microsoft’s writeup
    • Outlook: Fake or rogue antivirus has been a problem for over four years of scamming users in to buying antivirus software. It will continue to be a problem for at least the next six months to a year.

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Six Arrested in Japan for Android Malware

About 20 million Yen (close to $500,000 USD) was obtained through fake Android apps used by three top IT executives in Japan.

The main Android app was marketed as a video playing application. Adult websites were commonly the environment for this special download. Many of the operations that were conducted by the malware include a basic trojan style infection: stealing personal data and storing it on remote servers.

Approximately 9,000 users downloaded the app since December 2011. The names of these men and other information can be obtained here: yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T120614004390.htm

In Japan, it is a a crime to create malware, as noted here (you’ll need Google Translate or similar service if you cannot read Japanese language).

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