Tag Archive | Twitter

Added Security for Twitter Users to Come Soon!

Two-Factor Authentication

From spam to ham, Twitter deals with a lot of security issues on a daily basis. What about viruses/malware? I’m sure, yes. But, more importantly: account security. What do Twitter users need? Security assurance!

Therefore, Twitter is developing and perfecting a two-factor authentication method that will allow Twitter to not only ask for a password, but also a different credential to be sure of who is accessing your account.

From recent issues with Twitter accounts being hacked, it is best to have this in place, before it happens to other high profile organizations. Some of the recent organizations hacked were high profile including the Associated Press‘s account, CBS 60 Minutes account, and the BBC’s account.

Expect a shift in all online high profile websites switching to two-factor authentication. Apparently, it is the go-to emergency security solution.

Recent Hacks: NBC.com, Twitter, and Zendesk – Warnings: Tumblr, Pinterest

cybercrime

After dealing with multiple attacks on several sites, including Apple, Facebook, and Twitter – this being Java exploits. Now, it’s time to deal with more hacks, including NBC.com (which has been serving up malware for a day now) and Twitter. As in recent reports now, Tumblr and Pinterest have been forewarned.

The latest high profile organization that was recently hacked is the National Broadcast Company (NBC), more specifically on their website. The idea from the hackers is to use the website to infect visitors, using exploits and other JavaScript injections.

NBC.com’s hacked pages were modified to include additional HTML component called IFRAME, which is inline frame. This allows at least a 1px x 1px frame to be included independently in the webpage, which may contain malicious code. In HTML code, frames can be made to host web content. But, in the hands of the evildoers, aka cybercriminals, it is used as an effort to launch malware campaigns.

Malicious JavaScript was added to the mix, and also used the exploit kit called RedKit. It delivers one of two exploit files to try to take control of your browser.

I recognized something was wrong with NBC.com, which may have already been hacked a few weeks ago, and I posted the information on my Twitter account that a downloaded file was sent to my browser asking me to save or open it. This was on a sister site/blog, RedTape. I asked people to replicate it. The Twitter status can be found here.

What type of malware was delivered? Citadel or ZeroAccess, which are both crimeware families and botnets. They are usually part of several exploit kits.

This drive-by download situation is no good, as the pages were taken offline. Therefore, that dropped the traffic of those specific areas of the site. It is sure that this situation is a matter of cybercrime aimed at a financial side of things, not defacement or pranks.

Was it a big deal that it was NBC? No. In fact, it is sure the hackers were aimed at using a high-profile site, and apparently NBC.com was the easiest or quickest to access. Hackers rely on time and many other factors to make their approach(es).

Zendesk hacks and other various warnings

Zendesk is all about customer support…therefore no one really knows, except for those in the business of customer support. Big names use this service, which include Tumblr, Twitter, and Pinterest, among others. Hackers broke into the Zendesk systems, accessing email addresses of those big name customers, namely Twitter, Tumblr, and Pinterest.

How “pinteresting” that another hack has been born, which is related to a social network. Zendesk detailed the hack:

We’ve become aware that a hacker accessed our system this week. As soon as we learned of the attack, we patched the vulnerability and closed the access that the hacker had. Our ongoing investigation indicates that the hacker had access to the support information that three of our customers store on our system. We believe that the hacker downloaded email addresses of users who contacted those three customers for support, as well as support email subject lines. We notified our affected customers immediately and are working with them to assist in their response.

The companies involved made a point to tell its customers that they haven’t been hacked, but private information was stolen. Luckily, no password thievery was involved.

Obviously, an incident like this, just like the NBC.com incident, needs to be taken very seriously. Something must be done to stop the continuous hacks.

Twitter hacks additionally are nothing new. Many times, hackers used a backdoor, such as the tools the support team uses, to infiltrate the information of Twitter users. It’s not a huge gain, more possibly a waste of time.

Twitter ‘Unintentionally’ Sends Load of Reset Password Emails

A recent technical issue on Twitter sparked a bit of controversy, as users reported in Thursday saying they received password reset emails for their account. What was thought to be a compromise of Twitter via hacking, was actually just an unintentional security measure by Twitter.

According to TechCrunch, Twitter said that, in the course of its normal checks for compromised accounts, the company “unintentionally reset passwords of a larger number of accounts” than was necessary.

In addition to the details of the issue, Twitter made a statement, “We apologize for any inconvenience or confusion this may have caused.”

Part of this issue comes at no surprise that security researchers or Twitter users would think of it as a hack, because of Anonymous planning to attack Facebook recently, particularly on Guy Fawkes Day this past Monday.

This is just a good reminder that Twitter users should probably head to the social networking site and change their passwords, in case Twitter has not done either, A. disclosed enough information about the issue, and B. If it hasn’t been changed in a while.

However, if you cannot get in to your Twitter account, check the email you used when registered with Twitter, and see if a password reset email was sent to you. Don’t forget to check your spambox, just in case you don’t see it in your inbox.

When changing your password, please keep in mind a secure password, which we explain at this link.

r00tbeer or r00tbeersec Making Rounds with AMD, Data Breach

New hacking group dubbed r00tbeersec, with main leader r00tbeer has posted details about an attack on AMD blogging, the Intel chips rival. Some 30 KB of data was apparently stolen, that contained a total of 189 usernames/passwords from their WordPress blog site.

The main AMD blogs site shows the following image (after redirect):

Blackhole Malware on Twitter: “It’s you on photo?”

Common Twitter scams have been highlighted over time by many security organizations. Please take note of the intro below, and then see the full investigation by Sophos:

If you are a Twitter user please be very cautious of clicking on links that claim you are pictured in an online photo.

Thousands of malicious links are being spammed out, targeting innocent users of the micro-blogging network.

The links point to Russian webpages that ultimately attempt to infect your Windows PC using the notorious Blackhole exploit kit.

Read more on Sophos Blog
Kaspersky Lab E-Store

Twitter Ordered to Submit ‘Occupy Movement’ Data

A New York Judge has ordered Twitter to submit user data on an account related to an Occupy Movement protester:

The case, which the judge called one of “first impression,” concerns Malcolm Harris, who was among hundreds arrested Oct. 1 in an Occupy movement march along the Brooklyn Bridge.

Prosecutors sought tweets made to Harris’ account “to refute the defendant’s anticipated defense, that the police either led or escorted the defendant into stepping onto the roadway of the Brooklyn Bridge.”

While the outcome was expected, the case was being closely watched as the authorities increasingly monitor and move to access material posted on social networks. And the decision comes as Twitter reported that, for the first six months of the year, the United States sought information on Twitter user accounts 679 times, and Twitter produced some or all of the information 75 percent of the time.

Read more on this story now

%d bloggers like this: